Universal organizers

source: Freepik

In this post I want to briefly outline what the next posts will be about. As we know from our day to day life and also from psychology and neuroscience research that we are very good at classifying, organizing things around us, and we have a naturally inclination to do this, since this is how our brain works. Our brain tends to build a hierarchically organized picture of the world, organizing things into groups, sub-groups etc.

Why I mention all of this? Well, I also tend to organize things and the most I like to organize is data that I think could be of interest to me. I do it by using Google Chrome Bookmarks functionality where I have bookmarks folders stand for various categories and nested sub-folders as sub-categories etc. Surely, it is possible to do it in many different ways, for example using an old-fashioned way of card-index, or a more modern approach of using Excel spreadsheets, OneNote application or Google Sheets etc.

It turns out that well known and less known scientists, writers, artists did similar things to organize their own work and most of them, if not all of them, did this following similar kind of “algorithm”. They methodically organized, categorized things that mattered to what interested them the most. For example, the renowned science fiction write Jules Verne had an extensive and well organized card-index about different topics that allowed him to write his novels without him actually visiting places he wrote about. Another example was Wilson Bentley who meticulously photographed various kinds of snowflakes to be able to understand their formation. And there are ample other examples of this kind.

The main point is, that for us to be able to make sense of the surrounding world there is a need in systematical classification of various topics, objects, ideas for their later analysis and then synthesis of new insights. For how is it possible to understand anything that you’ve got when you do not know where to find it?

So, what I want to write in the next few posts in the blog is a well organized and categorized listing of the books I read end-to-end that could be potentially useful to other readers. I want to augment the listings of these books with short commentaries about an author or content of the book. That’s it.

The topics that I want to cover are aviation, space exploration (manned and unmanned), popular science (including math, physics, neuroscience), applied mathematics, creative thinking and TRIZ. Let’s take, for example, the category of aviation and its breakdown with regard to books.

  • Aviation
    • Civil Aviation
      • Biographies of plane engineers
        • 747 by Joe Sutter
      • Biographies of jet engine engineers
        • The Power to Fly: An Engineer’s Life by Brian H. Rowe
        • Herman the German: Just Lucky I Guess by Gerhard Neumann
    • Military Aviation
      • Jet Fighter Planes
        • Hornet: The inside Story of The F/A-18 by Orr Kelly
      • Biographies of military jet planes engineers
        • Kelly: More Than My Share of It All by Kelly Johnson
      • Low Observable Technology aka Stealth
      • Stealth Planes
        • SR-71
        • F-117
        • Tacit blue
        • B-2
        • F-22

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